vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 6: Certificate Template

10-5-2013 3-51-55 PMNow that you understand what type of SSL certificates you need and how many vCenter 5.5 requires, we need to create a Certificate Authority template that will mint proper certificates. You may very well be able to get away with the Microsoft “Web server” template, but it is missing a few properties that VMware still lists as a requirement. So to ensure you don’t run into any problems, this installment shows you how to setup those properties.

I’m assuming you are using a Microsoft CA for this exercise. Technically you can use any CA, so don’t think that you are just limited to Microsoft’s implementation. Certificates are standardized in the X.509 format. In a real enterprise environment CAs should be heavily locked down and you probably won’t have permissions to change anything on the CA. Find your CA administrator and have them complete this section. If you aren’t using a Microsoft CA, then the steps below won’t exactly apply to you. But research how to configure your CA for the “required” properties.

Blog Series

SQL 2012 AlwaysOn Failover Cluster for vCenter
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 1: Introduction
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 2: SSO 5.5 Reborn 
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 3: vCenter Upgrade Best Practices and Tips
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 4: ESXi 5.5 Upgrade Best Practices and Tips
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 5: SSL Deep Dive
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 6: SSL Certificate Template
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 7: Install SSO
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 8: Online SSL Minting
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 9: Offline SSL Minting
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 10: Update SSO Certificate
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 11: Install Web Client 
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 12: Configure SSO
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 13: Install Inventory Service
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 14: Create Databases
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 15: Install vCenter
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 16: vCenter SSL
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 17: Install VUM
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 18: VUM SSL
vSphere 5.5 Install Pt. 19: ESXi SSL Certificate

Permalink to this series: vexpert.me/Derek55
Permalink to the Toolkit script: vexpert.me/toolkit55

Certificate Template

1. Logon to your Microsoft root CA. In this case I’m using Windows Server 2012. Launch the Certification Authority console. I’ve already created a custom template, VMware-SSL. But ignore that for now (just like a cooking show I have my template already done in the oven) and locate the Certificate Template container. Right click and select Manage.

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2. Locate the Web Server template, right click and duplicate it.

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3. Don’t change anything on the compatibility tab. Don’t think you are clever and try changing the default value to something like Windows Server 2012. #Fail. On the General tab rename the template. I like using VMware-SSL because it has no spaces, so the template name and display name are the same. This avoids confusion down the road where a script requires the template name as a parameter. Spaces are allowed, but let’s not confuse the situation anymore than needed…we are already confused enough.

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4. Click on the Extensions tab then highlight Application Policies. Click Edit and add Client Authentication.

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5. Click on Key Usage and check the box to allow encryption of user data. Close out of all the certificate properties windows.

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6. Back in the CA window issue the new VMware-SSL template, by selecting the menu item shown below. A list of available templates will appear, and just click on VMware-SSL. It should now appear in the right pane, as you can see below. Sometimes CAs can be slow, and it could take a couple of minutes to appear. Do not panic; be patient. Once it appears you now have a good template to use for VMware certificates (vCenter, ESXi hosts, etc.).

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Summary

Creating a certificate template is not tricky and only takes a couple of minutes. It may take a few minutes for the new certificate type to replicate in AD. So don’t be too surprised if you can’t immediately see it. The steps are pretty much the same on Windows Server 2008 and later, so don’t worry if you aren’t yet using Windows Server 2012.

In Part 7 we (finally) get to mount the vCenter 5.5 ISO and install the SSO service. So yes, this install series is finally getting to the point were we can install something. But hopefully you are better educated about vCenter 5.5 than you were before you stumbled on this series. Impress your friends at your next cocktail party about SSL OU values and PEM files.

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